Sciadopitys verticillata 'Picola' / Picola Japanese umbrella pine

Sciadopitys verticillata 'Picola' is a dwarf, conical selection of Japanese umbrella pine with short, 2-inch (5 cm) long, shiny, dark-green needles. Because of its short branching, 'Picola' will maintain an attractive dense appearance, a plus for smaller gardens. After 10 years years of growth, a mature specimen will measure 30 inches (80 cm) tall and 15 inches (35 cm) wide, suggested an annual rate of growth of 2.5 inches (8 cm).

This cultivar originated as a seedling selected in 1980 by G.D. Böhlje Nursery, Westerstede, Germany. 'Picola' was one of three plants selected in 2012 for inclusion into the ACS Collectors' Conifer of the Year Program.

Sciadopitys verticillata 'Picola'
Photo by Herman Geers, Nursery, Boskoop
Sciadopitys verticillata 'Picola' — a closeup of foliage detail.
Photo by David Olszyk
Sciadopitys verticillata 'Picola' in the Flora Wonder Arboretum at Buchholz nursery, Gaston, Oregon.
Photo by David Olszyk

Comments

Lenka Kuklova

Good day, can you grow it in pot? Would move it to sheltered spot for winter. Thank you

Maxwell Cohn

yes, it will grow just fine in a pot. I would move it to a sheltered spot if the temperature was expected to fall to less than 0ºF.

Paul

Looking to order a dwarf (Picola) Japanese umbrella pine here on Long Island. Can't find anywhere. Not even online. Nurseries and even Home Depot have the bigger mature umbrella pines. Any tips on where to order are greatly appreciated.

KatailS

I found this umbrella pine at O’Brien Nurserymen in Granby, CT this past weekend… and of course, bought one. They do not do mail order, but it is well worth the trip to visit. Open most weekends thru the growing season… great selection of plants and display gardens

Daniel Spear

Paul, Iseli grows that cultivar. If you can’t find it online, you might check with your local nursery to see if it can be ordered from them in the fall.

Marlene Stewart

Is the root system aggressive? I have a dwarf umbrella pine planted close to a cement pad and was wondering if I should move it.

Maxwell Cohn

The roots of a dwarf conifer like this can do no harm whatsoever to a concrete slab.