Metasequoia glyptostroboides 'Miss Grace' / Miss Grace Dawn redwood

<em>Metasequoia glyptostroboides </em>'Miss Grace' is an unusual form of the Dawn redwood with strongly pendulous branches enhanced by soft, feathery, small bright green, deciduous foliage which turns orange-brown in fall. Produces a narrow small tree excellent as an accent or specimen. Annual rate of growth in most areas in 2 to 4 inches (5 - 10 cm), but will only grow as tall as it is staked.
'Miss Grace' is a name for the selection's graceful habit. The plant originated somewhere in New York and was introduced to the nursery trade by Buchholz &amp; Buchholz Nursery, Gaston, Oregon. It was originally thought to be a prostrate witch's broom. Here is a quote from Talon Buchholz regarding the original production. (from the Flora Wonder blog).
"Metasequoia glyptostroboides 'Miss Grace', an elegant weeping form of "Dawn Redwood," was discovered as a prostrate witch's broom. The original grafts were staked up by the crew when my back was turned. No, No!, I thought, for it was supposed to be grown as a ground-cover. Well, it can be; but I left these few plants on their stakes, and they turned out to be neat weeping trees."
Metasequoia glyptostroboides 'Miss Grace' is an unusual form of the Dawn redwood with strongly pendulous branches enhanced by soft, feathery, small bright green, deciduous foliage which turns orange-brown in fall. Produces a narrow small tree excellent as an accent or specimen. Annual rate of growth in most areas in 2 to 4 inches (5 - 10 cm), but will only grow as tall as it is staked. 'Miss Grace' is a name for the selection's graceful habit. The plant originated somewhere in New York and was introduced to the nursery trade by Buchholz & Buchholz Nursery, Gaston, Oregon. It was originally thought to be a prostrate witch's broom. Here is a quote from Talon Buchholz regarding the original production. (from the Flora Wonder blog). "Metasequoia glyptostroboides 'Miss Grace', an elegant weeping form of "Dawn Redwood," was discovered as a prostrate witch's broom. The original grafts were staked up by the crew when my back was turned. No, No!, I thought, for it was supposed to be grown as a ground-cover. Well, it can be; but I left these few plants on their stakes, and they turned out to be neat weeping trees."
Metasequoia glyptostroboides 'Miss Grace,' courtesy of Den Linderman - Birchwood.
Photo by Bill Barger
Metasequoia glyptostroboides 'Miss Grace' closeup of the unusual foliage. Courtesy of Dean Linderman - Birchwood
Photo by Bill Barger
Metasequoia glyptostroboides 'Miss Grace' at the Flora Wonder Arboretum, Gaston, OR. This is one of the original propagations.
Photo by Buchholz & Buchholz Nursery
Metasequoia glyptostroboides 'Miss Grace' at Dawes arboretum, Newark Ohio, during ACS national meeting, June 24, 2016.
Photo by William Dunagin

Comments

Denise Kora

I would love to have a 'Miss Grace' Dawn Redwood but I have a NARROW yard (40ft wide). I have to be very careful where I would plant one. Is 'Miss Grace' the narrowest cultivar available?

David Olszyk

Hi Denise. In the gallery above I loaded a picture of one of the original plants at the Buchholz Nursery. As you can see, it will get quite large over time. However it takes nicely to aesthetic pruning and shaping. It's your call, but I think this tree will overwhelm your space after 20 years.

matttruong

I would like to make a correction to the above origin of the is plant. Miss Grace was actually originally discovered in New York state and then later introduced by Buchholz Nursery (as per Buchholz).

David Olszyk

Hi Matt,

thanks for the update. The information you provide is allowing us to be well on our way to completing the record on this one, but it's a little vague. Do you know who found the original broom, when and where in NY state? This concerns me a bit because 'Miss Grace' is eerily similar to 'Bonsai' and I understand that 'Bonsai' came from New Jersey. It would be a bit of a disappointment if they were simultaneous introductions of the same plant . . .

matttruong

Hi David,

I don't have a confirmed record on who found it. I've attempted to contact Talon regarding this with no luck. Below is also a link to his blog which also mentions that the discovery was in New York State. I do not believe they are simultaneous introductions. 'Miss Grace' was discovered as a Witch's Broom, where 'Bonsai' is a seedling.
<a href="http://florawonder.blogspot.ca/search?q=miss+grace" rel="nofollow">
Buchholz Blog on Miss Grace</a>