Keteleeria fortunei / you shan

<em>Keteleeria fortunei</em>, first described in 1866 by (A. Murray) and completed by Élie-Abel Carrière (1818-1896), is commonly known as  油杉 (you shan)  in the Chinese language. It is named for Robert Fortune, who, in 1844, collected seeds in China and distributed them to the west.
[Dallimore, William, Albert Bruce Jackson, and S.G. Harrison. 1967. A handbook of Coniferae and Ginkgoaceae, 4th ed. New York: St. Martin's Press. xix, 729 p.]
Description. <em>Keteleeria fortunei</em> is an evergreen coniferous tree in the Pinaceae family which grows up to 75 feet (24 m) tall, with growth habit resembling Cedrus libani. Its bark is corky; branches are horizontal and spreading; branchlets orange-red, slender, with scattered hairs. Its buds are ovoid, rounded at the apex, with numerous keeled scales. Leaves of young trees are linear and stiff, 1 to 1.25 inches (2.5 - 3 cm) long, with spiny tips. Leaves of mature trees are 0.5 to 1.2 inches (12 - 31 mm) long, rounded or shortly pointed at the apex. The seed cones are cylindrical, 4 to 7 inches (10-18 cm) long by 1.2 to 2 inches (3 - 5 cm) wide (or to 3 inches (7.5 cm) wide when expanded), occurring on stout, hairy peduncles about one inch (2.5 cm) long, purple or brownish when mature; scales larger and broader at the apex than K. davidiana, the widest part (about 1.2 inches / 3 cm) being above the middle, the upper margin rounded and slightly toothed. Seeds are about 0.8 inch (2 cm) long with a 1.2 inch (3 cm) wing, both seed and wing larger than in K. davidiana, bright glossy brown in colour, the seed greyish beneath.
Distribution. This species is native to China (Fujian, Guangdong, Guangxi, Guizhou, Hunan, Jiangxi, Yunnan, Zhejiang provinces); to Hong Kong and Viet Nam. In southern China, it can be found in mountains near Fuzhou, where it was seen by Fortune in 1844, who distributed seeds.
Keteleeria fortunei, first described in 1866 by (A. Murray) and completed by Élie-Abel Carrière (1818-1896), is commonly known as 油杉 (you shan) in the Chinese language. It is named for Robert Fortune, who, in 1844, collected seeds in China and distributed them to the west. [Dallimore, William, Albert Bruce Jackson, and S.G. Harrison. 1967. A handbook of Coniferae and Ginkgoaceae, 4th ed. New York: St. Martin's Press. xix, 729 p.] Description. Keteleeria fortunei is an evergreen coniferous tree in the Pinaceae family which grows up to 75 feet (24 m) tall, with growth habit resembling Cedrus libani. Its bark is corky; branches are horizontal and spreading; branchlets orange-red, slender, with scattered hairs. Its buds are ovoid, rounded at the apex, with numerous keeled scales. Leaves of young trees are linear and stiff, 1 to 1.25 inches (2.5 - 3 cm) long, with spiny tips. Leaves of mature trees are 0.5 to 1.2 inches (12 - 31 mm) long, rounded or shortly pointed at the apex. The seed cones are cylindrical, 4 to 7 inches (10-18 cm) long by 1.2 to 2 inches (3 - 5 cm) wide (or to 3 inches (7.5 cm) wide when expanded), occurring on stout, hairy peduncles about one inch (2.5 cm) long, purple or brownish when mature; scales larger and broader at the apex than K. davidiana, the widest part (about 1.2 inches / 3 cm) being above the middle, the upper margin rounded and slightly toothed. Seeds are about 0.8 inch (2 cm) long with a 1.2 inch (3 cm) wing, both seed and wing larger than in K. davidiana, bright glossy brown in colour, the seed greyish beneath. Distribution. This species is native to China (Fujian, Guangdong, Guangxi, Guizhou, Hunan, Jiangxi, Yunnan, Zhejiang provinces); to Hong Kong and Viet Nam. In southern China, it can be found in mountains near Fuzhou, where it was seen by Fortune in 1844, who distributed seeds.

Attribution from: Chris Earle, The Gymnosperm Database ©2012

Keteleeria fortunei at the Sidney Botanical Gardens, Austrialia.
Photo by Tony Rodd, via Flikr
Keteleeria fortunei — foliage and mature cone.
Photo by Tony Rodd, via Arkive.org
Keteleeria fortunei — detail of foliage and immature seed cone, at University of Florida Research and Education Center, Quincy, Florida.
Keteleeria fortunei — detail of foliage and immature seed cone, at University of Florida Research and Education Center, Quincy, Florida.
Photo by Gary W. Knox
Keteleeria fortunei — detail of foliage and immature seed cone, at University of Florida Research and Education Center, Quincy, Florida.
Photo by Gary W. Knox

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