Ginkgo biloba 'Tubifolia' / Tubeleaf Maidenhair tree

<em>Ginkgo biloba</em> 'Tubifolia' is a semi-dwarf, shrubby tree form of Maidenhair tree with dense, twiggy branching and unusual slender leaves which are often rolled into trumpet-shaped tubes. In young plants, the foliage will be more-or-less normal, just a little more jagged in appearance. After 10 years, a mature specimen will become a small tree with fairly compact vase shaped branching and will measure 6 feet (2 m) tall and 4.5 feet (1.5 m) wide, an annual growth rate of 6 to 8 inches (15 - 20 cm).
This cultivar has been known to the trade since sometime in the 1990s, possibly earlier, given the Latinized cultivar name. It is unfortunately of unknown origin. Over the years many have suggested Anglicizing the name into "Tubeleaf," to correct the potential conflict with the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature's rule that bans the use of Latinized cultivar names for plants introduced after 1959. However, since an exact date of introduction cannot be established and 'Tubifolia' is a well-known name in the nursery trade, it should probably remain the way it is.
Another source of confusion is the cultivar name, 'Tubiformis' which is latin for "Tube-shaped," generally referring to the overall shape of the plant rather than describing just the foliage.
Ginkgo biloba 'Tubifolia' is a semi-dwarf, shrubby tree form of Maidenhair tree with dense, twiggy branching and unusual slender leaves which are often rolled into trumpet-shaped tubes. In young plants, the foliage will be more-or-less normal, just a little more jagged in appearance. After 10 years, a mature specimen will become a small tree with fairly compact vase shaped branching and will measure 6 feet (2 m) tall and 4.5 feet (1.5 m) wide, an annual growth rate of 6 to 8 inches (15 - 20 cm). This cultivar has been known to the trade since sometime in the 1990s, possibly earlier, given the Latinized cultivar name. It is unfortunately of unknown origin. Over the years many have suggested Anglicizing the name into "Tubeleaf," to correct the potential conflict with the International Code of Botanical Nomenclature's rule that bans the use of Latinized cultivar names for plants introduced after 1959. However, since an exact date of introduction cannot be established and 'Tubifolia' is a well-known name in the nursery trade, it should probably remain the way it is. Another source of confusion is the cultivar name, 'Tubiformis' which is latin for "Tube-shaped," generally referring to the overall shape of the plant rather than describing just the foliage.
At the J.C. Raulston Arboretum, showing the collected rain in the fused "trumpets". There is no pre-1959 valid publication of a Latin name for this clone, so the vernacular name is correct.
Photo by Larry Hatch
Close-up of foliage There seems to be some variability in the form of the leaves. from cup forms to petals.
Excellent photo of foliage. This photo shows in great detail what gave this clone its name.
Photo by agardens.com

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