Cryptomeria japonica 'Rein's Dense Jade' / Rein's Dense Jade Japanese cedar

Cryptomeria japonica 'Rein's Dense Jade' is a dense, broadly pyramidal dwarf cultivar of Japanese cedar. Its foliage is rich jade-green, turning purple-bronze in sufficiently cold winters. Typical rate of growth in most areas is 9 to 12 inches (22 - 30 cm) a year resulting in a 8 to 10 foot (2.5 - 3 m) conical tree after 10 years in the landscape.

John Vermeulen & Sons nursery of Neshanic Station, New Jersey is credited with the origin and introduction of 'Rein's Dense Jade' in the mid 1970s. It was propagated from a witch's broom on a specimen of Cryptomeria japonica 'Lobbii.'

Cryptomeria japonica 'Rein's Dense Jade' at Cox Arboretum, Canton, Georgia.
Photo by Tom Cox
Cryptomeria japonica 'Rein's Dense Jade' showing characteristic winter bronzing.
Photo by Tom Cox

Comments

Fiona Franklin

Hello
Im trying to find Crytomeria Japonica Rein's Dense Jade but im in the UK. Could you please tell me if you know of anyone here who stocks it ?
Kind regards
Fiona

David Olszyk

Hello Fiona, there is no way that the American Conifer Society could possibly know what's available overseas. Maybe reach out to the British Conifer Society??

John st. Cyr

I have a Rein's dense jade cedar about two years old. Some branches are drooping and have no new growth. Does species have any insect or disease problems? Solution?

David Olszyk

Quite the opposite, John ... 'Rein's Dense Jade' is very easy plant to grow. To answer your question, it would help to know where you live. What size was it when you planted it? Is it getting enough water? ... enough sun?? It's also possible that there are root issues, i.e. girdling roots / planted too deep ...

John st. Cyr

I live in southeast Massachusetts. It was about five and one half feet when it was planted. It is in full sun. It gets enough water. I use a long moisture prob to test. I was very careful in planting with help from my son who is a retired arborist. The sub soil is hard pan about a 18 inches down. I have planted several other small trees and shrubs without any problem. I have photos of the problem areas.

John st. Cyr

Adding to my last comments - I have not fertilized. Should I do so with Hollytone? Is it too late in the season?

David Olszyk

no need to ever fertilize a tree that's planted in the ground ... 5.5 feet tall is a pretty big plant for transplanting. Something that size could take several years to establish. I also think that MA may be borderline hardiness for this species. Have you seen sub-zero temps since it's been in the ground?

John st. Cyr

We have not had sub-zero temperatures since planting. I bought it from a reputable nursery and confirmed that it is appropriate for our hardiness zone. I noticed the problem in the spring and it has spread. In the winter, I placed four long fence posts around the tree and used i inch wide plastic ribbon to support the branches.

David Olszyk

John said, "I placed four long fence posts around the tree and used i inch wide plastic ribbon to support the branches."

Why?? That's a very concerning statement. Sounds like the roots never turned on. A lot of times it takes a dead tree 3-4 years before it actually looks dead.

John st. Cyr

Sorry I did not make myself clear. That arrangement was for last winter to protect against snow damage. Does your last comment mean that you think the tree is dying?

David Olszyk

Your tree could already be dead, but there's no way I can know for sure through an online conversation.

John st. Cyr

I took a photo of the area in question to a local arborist employed by a nursery which seems such trees. After examining it closely, he indicated that the area of concern is actually new growth. Thank you for your many replies. I realize that you could not make an accurate assessment by email communication.