Chamaecyparis thyoides subsp. henryae / Gulf Whitecedar

<em>Chamaecyparis thyoides</em> subsp. <em>henryae,</em> first described by<em> </em>(Li H.L.) E. Murray in 1966, is commonly known as Gulf Whitecedar. Some publications will treat this variety as a separate species, Ch. henryae . In 1962, Li segregated the disjunct Gulf Coast populations in Alabama, Florida, and Mississippi as Ch. henryae based on smoother bark, less flattened branchlets, lighter yellowish green foliage, steeper angle of leaf appression to the stem, more prominently keeled but less glandular leaves, and slightly larger cones, seeds, and seed wings. These features contrasted with phenotypes found in the 'northern and mid-Atlantic' populations, and Li proposed a relationship to Cupressus nootkatensis (which at the time was generally assigned to Chamaecyparis) rather than to Ch. thyoides.
[Michener, David C. 1993. Chamaecyparis. Flora of North America Editorial Committee (eds.): Flora of North America North of Mexico, Vol. 2. Oxford University Press.]
 "Preliminary comparison of herbarium material from the Southeast (including populations in Georgia and Florida) leads to retention of Ch. thyoides as a subtly variable complex with the imperfectly differentiated Ch. henryae at one end of the range"; 
Although close to typical Ch. thyoides, it is ecologically adapted to greatly different climatic conditions, and field and genetic research is required before the taxon can be dismissed or reduced in status.
Distribution. This specific varietal is native to the American and Mexican Gulf coast (Florida, Alabama and Mississippi) where it can be found growing in bogs and swamps on the coastal plain at altitudes from sea level up to 150 feet (50 m) elevation.
Chamaecyparis thyoides subsp. henryae, first described by (Li H.L.) E. Murray in 1966, is commonly known as Gulf Whitecedar. Some publications will treat this variety as a separate species, Ch. henryae . In 1962, Li segregated the disjunct Gulf Coast populations in Alabama, Florida, and Mississippi as Ch. henryae based on smoother bark, less flattened branchlets, lighter yellowish green foliage, steeper angle of leaf appression to the stem, more prominently keeled but less glandular leaves, and slightly larger cones, seeds, and seed wings. These features contrasted with phenotypes found in the 'northern and mid-Atlantic' populations, and Li proposed a relationship to Cupressus nootkatensis (which at the time was generally assigned to Chamaecyparis) rather than to Ch. thyoides. [Michener, David C. 1993. Chamaecyparis. Flora of North America Editorial Committee (eds.): Flora of North America North of Mexico, Vol. 2. Oxford University Press.] "Preliminary comparison of herbarium material from the Southeast (including populations in Georgia and Florida) leads to retention of Ch. thyoides as a subtly variable complex with the imperfectly differentiated Ch. henryae at one end of the range"; Although close to typical Ch. thyoides, it is ecologically adapted to greatly different climatic conditions, and field and genetic research is required before the taxon can be dismissed or reduced in status. Distribution. This specific varietal is native to the American and Mexican Gulf coast (Florida, Alabama and Mississippi) where it can be found growing in bogs and swamps on the coastal plain at altitudes from sea level up to 150 feet (50 m) elevation.
Chamaecyparis thyoides subsp. Henryae growing in nature on the Florida panhandle.
Photo by Salicaceae via GardenWeb

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