Abies concolor 'St. John's Broom' / St. John's Broom white fir

Abies concolor 'St. John's Broom' is a tidy, flattened-globose selection of white fir. Over time, older specimens will begin to spread out, becoming irregularly spreading. Unlike many dwarf firs, it is not known to assume apical dominance. Branching is short and congested; and foliage is species-typical blush gray in color. After 10 years of growth, a mature specimen will measure 12 inches (30 cm) tall and 24 inches (60 cm) wide, an annual growth rate of 1 to 2 inches (2.5 - 5 cm).

This cultivar originated as a witch's broom found in the early 1990s, on the grounds of St. John's Church in Rapids City, Illinois, by Randy Dykstra of Fulton, Illinois. In his field notes, Chub Harper describes the original broom as, "small in size, and low; one of the best concolor brooms."

Abies concolor 'St. John's Broom' — a very old specimen in an arboretum setting.
Photo by Bill Barger
Abies concolor 'St. John's Broom' at Bickelhaupt Arboretum, Clinton, Iowa.
Photo by Dax Herbst
Abies concolor 'St. John's Broom' — in a private garden setting.
Photo by Bill Barger
Abies concolor 'St. John's Broom' — in a private garden setting.
Photo by Bill Barger
Abies concolor 'St. John's Broom' — a closeup of foliage during spring foliage push.
Photo by Bill Barger
Abies concolor 'St. John's Broom' — a closeup of foliage detail.
Photo by Bill Barger
Abies concolor 'St. John's Broom' — a closeup of foliage detail.
Photo by Bill Barger
Abies concolor 'St. John's Broom' — a closeup of foliage detail.
Photo by Bill Barger

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