Abies concolor 'Hosta la Vista' / Hosta la Vista White fir

Abies concolor 'Hosta la Vista' is a globose to flattened globose selection of White fir with thick, Blue-green needles that are slightly recurved and have a glaucous, powdery coating on their surfaces. After 10 years a mature specimen will likely growth to at least 18 inches (45 cm) tall and somewhat wider, a rate of growth of 1.5 to 2 inches (3 - 5 cm) per year.

This cultivar originated as a witch's broom found in the early 2000s at Hidden Lake Gardens, Tipton, Michigan. Since the broom is in plain sight, it's impossible to know who the first observer was to see it. Gerry Donaldson, the long-time horticulture manager and Hidden Lake Gardens, is credited with naming the mutation and initially distributing propagation material to several growers, thus introducing it to the nursery trade. The cultivar name is a rather clever play on words. The original broom was found in a part of the arboretum that overlooks the garden's hosta collection. So "Hosta la Vista" literally translates into "View of the Hostas."

In a recent email from Gerry, he conveys that a smaller, tighter witch's broom has recently developed within the 'Hosta la Vista' mother broom. This "mini-broom" has been provisionally named 'Hosta la Vista Baby,' and is currently under evaluation with anticipated release to the trade by 2020.

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Abies concolor 'Hosta al Vista' — a closeup of the original broom at Hidden Lake Gardens, Tipton, Michigan.
Photo by Bill Barger
Abies concolor 'Hosta al Vista' — the original broom tree at Hidden Lake Gardens, Tipton, Michigan.
Photo by Bill Barger
Abies concolor 'Hosta la Vista' — a closeup of foliage detail.
Photo by Sam Pratt, courtesy of ConiferKingdom.com
Abies concolor 'Hosta la Vista' — a young plant at Conifer Kingdom Nursery, Silverton Oregon.
Photo by Sam Pratt
Abies concolor 'Hosta la Vista' — a super closeup showing the powdery blue needles.
Photo by Sam Pratt, courtesy of ConiferKingdom.com
Abies concolor 'Hosta la Vista' — a grafted plant at Hidden Lake Gardens, Tipton, Michigan, July, 2016.
Photo by William Dunagin

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