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Additions to the International Conifer Register

The following are the conifer registrations received by the American Conifer Society and accepted by the ICF at the Royal Horticultural Society. The abbreviations used are Reg: the registrant, O: the originator – the raiser or person who first noticed the merit of a spontaneous variant, N: the nominant or name-giver, I: the introducer, usually the business which first distributed the plant commercially. All descriptions and comments are essentially those of the registrants.

— Sharon McDonald, International Conifer Registrar, RHS Garden Wisley


 Abies

 A. fraseri ‘Little Bryan’
Compact pyramidal shape. Branches vertical and rigid. Slow-growing, less than 5cm a year, 0.9m × 0.6m after 11 years.
O: L. & M. Downey, Downey Tree Farm & Nursery, Quebec, Canada (2000), N: L. & M. Downey, Downey Tree Farm & Nursery, Quebec, Canada (2009), REG: L. & M. Downey, Downey Tree Farm & Nursery, Quebec, Canada (2011).
Abies fraseri hybrid
Found growing in the wild in the Eastern Townships of Quebec, Canada.

A. fraseri ‘Slim Jim’
Fastigiate and narrowly conical. Needles short and compact. Slow-growing, less than 5cm a year, 2.13m × 51cm after 12 years.
O: L. & M. Downey, Downey Tree Farm & Nursery, Quebec, Canada (1998), N: L. & M. Downey, Downey Tree Farm & Nursery, Quebec, Canada (2009), REG: L. & M. Downey, Downey Tree Farm & Nursery, Quebec, Canada (2011).
Abies fraseri hybrid
Found growing in the wild in the Eastern Townships of Quebec, Canada

Cedrus

C. brevifolia ‘Eleni’
O: Yiakos Kallis, Nicosia, Cyprus (2007), N: Yiakos Kallis (), REG: Yiakos Kallis (2008)
Slow-growing; branchlets many, short; leaves shorter than normal in densely packed short shoots.
Propagated from a tree c. 300 years old in Cedar Valley, Paphos Forest, Cyprus 11 × 4m, 30cm dbh, with an annual growth rate of 4cm. The tree was upright with ascending branches arching outwards at the tips. Grafted plants remain slow-growing. Named for Saint Eleni, credited for saving Cyprus from drought in 327AD.
Nomenclatural Standard: colour print supplied by registrant (WSY0117904).

Chamaecyparis

C. lawsoniana ‘Filip’s Golden Tears’
Upright; side branches hanging straight down; foliage golden yellow. Does not burn in full sun. 3 × 0.7m at 5 years; annual growth rate c. 70cm.
O: Edwin Smits, Volkel, The Netherlands (1996), N: Edwin Smits, I: Boomkwekerij Edwin Smits, REG: Edwin Smits (2008).
C. lawsoniana ‘Dik’s Weeping’ (*) × C. lawsoniana ‘Stewartii.’
(*)Most like ‘Dik’s Weeping’ but differs by its golden yellow colour. Found in Uden, The Netherlands.
Described in De Boomkwekerij Sept. 2007.

C. lawsoniana ‘Guernsey Cream’
Bun-shaped, similar to ‘Gnome’ but with gold splashed irregularly on dark green foliage. 4cm × 10cm after 5 years.
O: D.G. Arblaster, Les Sages, Guernsey (2005), REG: D.G. Arblaster, Les Sages, Guernsey (2010).
Sport from C. lawsoniana ‘Gnome’
Nomenclatural Standard: colour print supplied by registrant (WSY0117906).

Cupressus

C. sempervirens ‘Xylia’
Globose, dark green, with branches spirally arranged. 1.0m × 1.0m after 10 years.
O: Y. Kallis, Nicosia, Cyprus (2000), REG: Y. Kallis, Nicosia, Cyprus (2011).
Found as a witch’s broom. The name derives from the nearby Xylias mountains.
Nomenclatural Standard: colour print supplied by registrant (WSY0117907).

Juniperus

J. × pfitzeriana ‘King of Spring’
Semi-spreading habit; new growth deep golden yellow; juvenile foliage at centre of plant. Does not burn in full sun. 60 × 120cm at 10 years; annual growth rate c. 15cm.
O: Edwin Smits, Meerkensweg 8, 5408 PB Volkel, The Netherlands (1992), N: Edwin Smits, Meerkensweg 8, 5408 PB Volkel, The Netherlands (1996), I: Boomkweketij Edwin Smits, Meerkensweg 8, 5408 PB Volkel, The Netherlands (2002), REG: Edwin Smits, Meerkensweg 8, 5408 PB Volkel, The Netherlands (2008).
‘King of Spring’ can be compared to ‘Old Gold’, which has green-gold foliage. Raised from a budsport of ‘Pfitzeriana Aurea’ found in Saksen Weimar Kazerne, Arnhem, The Netherlands.
Described in De Boomkwekerij Aug. 2002

Picea

P. orientalis ‘Barnes’
Bun-shaped, low-spreading, dark needled. Excellent dark green winter colour. Slow growing, 7.5-10cm per year, 1.3m × 2.4m after 20 years
O: Layne Ziegenfuss (c. 1970), I: (c. 1980), REG: Richard A. Larson (2011)
Found as a witch’s broom. An old cultivar that was never registered, but yet was propagated and sold in commercial numbers for many years. Information regarding the origin of this plant can only be circulated and preserved through the registration process.

P. rubens ‘Charlotte’s Pillow’
Bun-shaped, dense, compact, dark green. Slow-growing 5-7.5cm per year, 0.6-0.9m after 25 years.
O: William C. Journeay, Milton, Nova Scotia, Canada (pre- 1986), REG: William C. Journeay, Milton, Nova Scotia, Canada (2011).
Found in a forest cut in Annapolis County, Nova Scotia, Canada. Named for the Registrant’s late mother.

P. mariana ‘Craig’
Oval, compact, symmetrical, dark green. Slow growing, 5cm per year, 0.6m × 0.3m after 10 years. Similar to P. glauca ‘Laurin’ and P. abies ‘Ohlendorffii.’
O: William C. Journeay, Milton, Nova Scotia, Canada (2001), REG: William C. Journeay, Milton, Nova Scotia, Canada (2011)
Found in a forest plantation of black spruce in Halifax County, Nova Scotia, Canada. Named for the Registrant’s son.

P. mariana ‘Jack William’
Upright, narrowly compact, with downturned weeping branches. Fast growing, 0.3-0.6m per year, 4.5m × 1.2m after 12 years.
O: William C. Journeay, Milton, Nova Scotia, Canada (1999), REG: William C. Journeay, Milton, Nova Scotia, Canada (2011).
Found in a regenerating forest area in Queen’s County, Nova Scotia, Canada.

P. pungens ‘Millbrook’
0.7m × 2.1m. Grows around 12cm/year. Bun-shaped, with dense lateral growth. Not as blue as P. pungens ‘Globosa’, but is more elegantly groomed.
O: C.J. Stupka, Pulaski, Pennsylvania, USA, REG: Dr Teresa K. Park, Carmel, Indiana, USA (2012).
Taken from a witch’s broom. This cv. may not be as easily propagated as some other forms of P. pungens.
Nomenclatural Standard: colour print supplied by registrant (WSY0117902).

P. abies ‘Red Man’
Weeping, with graceful, symmetrical, swooping branches and brilliant red flush. New growth deep, almost burgundy-red. Rapid growth, 0.6-0.9m per year, 3.7m × 3m after 6 years. Resembles P. abies ‘Rubra Spicata’
O: William C. Journeay, Nova Scotia, Canada (2005), REG: William C. Journeay, Nova Scotia, Canada (2011).
Originated from a batch of seedlings from Scandinavia.

P. glauca ‘Sandy’s Gold’
Pyramidal, brilliant yellow spring growth, fading to green, with white tips in winter. Resembles P. orientalis ‘Skylands’. Rapid growth, 0.6-0.9m per year, 6.0m × 3.0m in 12 years.
O: William C. Journeay, Milton, Nova Scotia, Canada (1999), REG: William C. Journeay, Milton, Nova Scotia, Canada (2011).
Found growing in an old field near New Ross, Nova Scotia, Canada. Sandy is the name of the registrant’s wife.

P. glauca ‘Scotia Spider’
Upright and straight, with minimal lateral or internodal branching. Distinctive hook at the ends of the lateral branches. Rapid growth 0.3-0.6m per year, 6.0m × 1.8m after 20 years
O: William C. Journeay, Milton, Nova Scotia, Canada (1991), REG: William C. Journeay, Milton, Nova Scotia, Canada (2011).
Located along provincial highway in Lunenburg County, Nova Scotia, Canada. Named for its gangly spider-like habit.

P. rubens ‘Shane’
Oval to globose, compact and dense, very symmetrical. Similar to P. mariana ‘Craig’ and P. glauca ‘Shawna’. 5-10cm per year, 0.6m × 0.3m after 10 years.
O: William C. Journeay, Milton, Nova Scotia, Canada (2001), REG: William C. Journeay, Milton, Nova Scotia, Canada (2011)
Found in a naturally regenerated forest stand in Annapolis County, Nova Scotia, Canada. Named for the Registrant’s son.

Pinus

P. resinosa ‘Nova Nest’
Very compact and dense, nest-like appearance, with uniform shape. 5-10cm per year, 0.5-1.6m after 10 years
O: William C. Journeay, Milton, Nova Scotia, Canada (2001), REG: William C. Journeay, Milton, Nova Scotia, Canada (2011).
Found as a witch’s broom in Halifax County, Nova Scotia, Canada.

P. strobus ‘Princess Kiara’
Upright, with single stem. Short, dense, soft, greyish green needles. Slow to moderate growth 0.15-0.3m per year, 3m × 1.8m after 12 years.
O: William C. Journeay, Milton, Nova Scotia, Canada (), REG: William C. Journeay, Milton, Nova Scotia, Canada (2011).
Found along a forest road in Western Nova Scotia, Canada. Named for the Registrant’s grand-daughter

Pseudotsuga

P. menziesii ‘Les Barres’
Small, rather pyramidal, well furnished to apex; leaves long, dark green.
O: Günter Eschrich, Recklinghausen, Germany (1989), REG: Günter Eschrich, Recklinghausen, Germany (2008)
Pseudotsuga menziesii `Les Barres’ Linssen (Libo Nurs.) checklist (1990) name only, Eschrich (2008).
Ortet from a witches broom. Named for Arboretum National des Barres, Nogent-sur-Vernisson, France

Sequoiadendron

S. giganteum ‘Idaho Endurance’
Pyramidal. Fast growing when young, 37m × 11m after 90 years. Resembles ‘Hazel Smith’, but is thought to be more cold resistant.
O: (pre- 1913), N: Camille Hartrup, Troy, Idaho, USA (2010), REG: Paul Warnick, University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho, USA (2011).
The origin of the seed is unknown. The seed was planted in 1913 in a nursery at the University of Idaho. The name reflects the idea that this is a graft from probably the oldest and largest Giant Sequoia that has survived so far north east of the Cascade Mountains.

S. giganteum ‘Neuchâtel’
Dwarf, to 2.5m in 20 years, otherwise like type.
O: Gunter Eschrich, Recklinghausen, Germany (1971), N: (0), I: (0), REG: G. Eschrich (2008)
Produced from a witch’s broom.

Taxus

T. baccata ‘Bishport Gold’
1m × 1m after 11 years. Arching. Striking orange/gold spring growth, gold retained throughout the winter. Growth around 22cm/year.
O: M. Lillington, Bishopworth, Bristol, England (2001), REG: M. Lillington, Bishopworth, Bristol, England (2012).
Found in a village/suburb on the southern edge of Bristol.
Nomenclatural Standard: colour print supplied by registrant (WSY0117901)

Tetraclinis

T. articulata ‘Aurica’
Globose, with light green to gold dense foliage. 1.0m × 1.0m after 10 years
O: Y. Kallis, Nicosia, Cyprus (2000), REG: Y. Kallis, Nicosia, Cyprus (2011)
Tetraclinis articulata ‘Aurica’ Kallis
Found as a witch’s broom.
Nomenclatural Standard: herbarium specimen supplied by registrant (WSY0133969).

Thujopsis

T. dolabrata ‘Birr Castle’
Slow-growing, oval; branches (sprays) narrow; foliage compact, colour as type. Has grown to 9 × 7m in ?30 years.
O: Birr Castle, Offaly, Eire (), N: Birr Castle staff, Offaly, Eire (2008), REG: Euan Roxburgh, Bere Ferrers, UK (2009).

Thuja

T. occidentalis ‘Enlightened’
1.8m × 1.2m after 5 years. Oval to columnar in outline. Pale green, with cream closest to the branchlets in summer and creamy gold in winter. New growth is pale lime green, with cream. Very weather resistant. Similar to ‘Marrisen’s Sulphur’, except in the size of the branchlets and does not burn.
O: Dr Clark D. West, Harrison, Ohio, USA (c. 1994), REG: Dr Teresa K. Park, Carmel, Indiana, USA (2012)
T. occidentalis ‘Marrisen’s Sulphur’ hybrid

T. occidentalis ‘Gold Drop’
Begins pyramidal, becoming more globose with maturity. Yellow foliage in summer, becoming gold in winter. 12cm per year, 2.7m × 1.5m after 21 years. Shape similar to T. ‘Holmstrup’, but colour resembles that of T. ‘Sunkist.’
O: Dr Clark D. West, Harrison, Ohio, USA (c. 1990), N: Dr Clark D. West, Harrison, Ohio, USA (1998), I: Al Forinash, Ashtabula, Ohio, USA (2007), REG: Dr Clark D. West, Harrison, Ohio, USA (2011).

T. occidentalis ‘Holmstrup’ hybrid
Name derived from the colour of the plant and its shape in the first 6 to 8 years

T. occidentalis ‘Pincushion’
Bun-shaped, symmetrical, with thread-like, airy foliage similar to T. occidentalis ‘Filiformis’. Slow growing to zero growth after 4 years of age, 0.45m × 0.45m after 6 years
O: Dr Clark D. West, Harrison, Ohio, USA (2005), N: Dr Clark D. West, Harrison, Ohio, USA (2009), I: Dr Clark D. West, Harrison, Ohio, USA (2011), REG: Dr Clark D. West, Harrison, Ohio, USA (2011).

T. occidentalis ‘Filiformis’ sdlg, probably self pollinated.
Name derived from the fact that most of the filiform leaves are green, giving the appearance of a cushion. Scattered filiform leaves are dark brown and are the pins.

Tsuga

T. canadensis ‘Bambi’
Bun-shaped and low-spreading, compact and uniform. Dark coloured, with a layered appearance and soft texture. 7.5cm-10cm per year, 0.6-0.9m after 20 years
O: William C. Journeay, Milton, Nova Scotia, Canada (1991), REG: William C. Journeay, Milton, Nova Scotia, Canada (2011)
Found near Medway Lake, Annapolis County, Nova Scotia, Canada. Names for its dainty appearance.

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