Join ACS
Member Login

Home \ Discussion \ General Discussions \ Red, Black and White Pines

Red, Black and White Pines (6 Replies)

Posted December 21, 2016 at 11:53 am

In very simple terms how are these defined?

Cancel Edit
Save
Posted December 22, 2016 at 11:55 am

Hi Louise, they are defined simply by their outward appearance.

Red pines: fine needles held in bundles of two. Reddish bark. (Pinus densiflora, sylvestris)
Black pines: heavy needles held in bundles of two (sometimes three). Black, rough bark. (Pinus nigra, thunbergii).
White pines: fine needles held in bundles of five. Smooth white or gray bark. (Pinus strobus, flexilis, strobiformis, parviflora, albicaulis).

Cancel Edit
Save
Posted December 22, 2016 at 8:20 pm

Thank you! That is just what I wanted. I have tried to find this info on my own and couldn’t.

Cancel Edit
Save
Posted December 24, 2016 at 12:28 pm

There are also a couple of more colors that we haven’t accounting for:

Yellow pines: named for the color of their wood (Pinus ponderosa, jeffreyi)
Gray pine: named for an overall gray (ghostly) appearance in the landscape (Pinus sabineana).

Cancel Edit
Save
Posted January 9, 2017 at 1:36 pm

To further complicate the matter, each pine requires different conditions to grow to their full potential. Not every pine is bullet proof.

Cancel Edit
Save
Posted January 9, 2017 at 2:09 pm

I suppose that applies to miniature and dwarf conifers too? Can you be a little more specific remembering few members are botanists. Thank you.

Cancel Edit
Save
Posted January 16, 2017 at 5:52 pm

Hi Louise, indeed it does. For example, Austrian pine (Pinus nigra) is prone to all sorts of needle blights in the midwest. Dwarf Tsuga do battle with Hemlock woolly adelgid. Western pines such as monophylla, flexilis and aristata would likely be dead on arrival in the southeast. They dislike humidity.

Cancel Edit
Save

You must be to reply to this topic.

Tex_CircleOak_20120425_6