Join ACS
Member Login

Home \ Discussion \ Conifer FAQ \ potential cultivar of Eastern Red Cedar?

potential cultivar of Eastern Red Cedar? (14 Replies)

Posted October 29, 2014 at 10:08 pm

This is a photo of an Eastern Red Cedar (Juniperus virginiana) that I took recently. I was driving along the highway and was shocked to see a seemingly weeping individual. Most individuals have a fairly open and upright growth habit (some more fastigiate than others), but they are NEVER weeping like this individual. Notice the usual form in the small tree to the right of the weeping one. The other photo is another example of the usual open growth habit. Is this a potential cultivar?

Note: This plant is growing in a USDA zone 5b-6 area in Ontario Canada. Soil is somewhat thin over granitic pre-cambrian bedrock (Southern portion of Canadian shield).

Thank you

Clay

Cancel Edit
Save
Posted October 30, 2014 at 9:49 am

I think you’re onto something there. I’m a huge fan of the “weirder-the-better club.” I vote propagate a few and see what it does. Keep in mind that such a plant will never be seen at a Home Depot garden center. Good find!

Cancel Edit
Save
Posted October 31, 2014 at 4:51 pm

I like it!

Cancel Edit
Save
Posted October 31, 2014 at 11:12 pm

Thank you, Dave and Sara!
Dave, I am am member of the “weirder the better club” as well. 🙂 After all, aren’t cultivars all about finding rare and unique genes are preserving them? Could anyone recommend some literature on how to propagate Juniperus cuttings?
Thank you.

Cancel Edit
Save
Posted November 1, 2014 at 11:42 am

Juniperus is usually pretty easy to root from cuttings. Here is a website that does a pretty good job at explaining the process. Good luck.

Cancel Edit
Save
Posted November 16, 2014 at 9:34 am

Clay, your find seems to be wild and unique enough, with worthful genetics. I think in a good nursery, based on a good concept this juniper could be produced. Staked up to 3 meters, after then leave it free hanging – this is one concept for a better form. If so, we will need later a nice name.

Zsolt

conifertreasury.org

Cancel Edit
Save
Posted November 16, 2014 at 7:40 pm

David, Thank you very much for the website!

Zsolt, Thank you very much for the advice. Could it possibly be a registered cultivar? If so, is that done through the ACS?

Eventually I will post an update about the progress of the cutting.

Thank you

Clay

Cancel Edit
Save
Posted November 16, 2014 at 8:45 pm

Clay, establishing a new cultivated variety (cultivar) of a species is a multiple step process. You’ve already done the first part in finding a natural mutation that is distinctive enough from the typical variety to warrant special recognition. The second part is to propagate it and evaluate whether the mutation is stable over subsequent generations. If the public deems it garden-worthy, name it and introduce it to the trade via a nursery or through a through the vast network of conifer collectors. If at some point you want to officially register your cultivar with the Royal Horticultural Society (the official world-recognized conifer registrar), you can do so through the process detailed at this link.

Cancel Edit
Save
Posted November 16, 2014 at 10:16 pm

David, thank you very much for this information. I will let you know how it goes.

Cancel Edit
Save
Posted November 17, 2014 at 6:49 am

Clay, you are now well informed by David.

Welcome to the board of organic conifer breeders! Visit please conifertreasury.org/Conifering/Organic(Urban) Conifering. You will see there what kind of find is yours. Selecting of aged conifers is a new possibility, described first on this conifer portal as a common american and hungarian technology. Wish you all the best!

Zsolt

Cancel Edit
Save

You must be to reply to this topic.

Iseli_20120921_3877