Join ACS
Member Login

Home \ Discussion \ Conifer FAQ \ Pinus glabra witches broom?

Pinus glabra witches broom? (5 Replies)

Posted August 27, 2018 at 8:51 pm

I think I may have found a witches broom on a pinus glabra. The tree also has some other very congested tight balls about 3in in diameter, but they also had some brown needles. This one seems pretty healthy, though very small. I was hoping to comfirm that this is a witches broom, and also locate an individual that could help me propogate it. I have never grafted anything, and it being so small it’s probably not gonna have much for scion. Anyways I’m located in Summerville, SC, 29485. If there is anyone close by that wants to make an attempt at propogation reply to the forum.

Cancel Edit
Save
Posted August 27, 2018 at 9:53 pm

that looks really promising, Patrick. I would recommend watching it for a few years to determine whether it’s a stable mutation or not. I’ve seen pines do this on a very temporary basis if there was some damage to the bud prior to its extension in the spring.

As for potential propagation, I recommend Bruce Appeldoorn. He’s in Bostic, NC and is a really good guy.

Cancel Edit
Save
Posted September 25, 2018 at 2:23 pm

I would certainly be interested in seeing these suspicious growths in person and possibly having Bruce take a shot at propagating at the appropriate time. I have found brooms in just about every species of pine in the south but haven’t spent much time searching the coastal plain. A Pinus glabra broom would be at the top of my list to find though. Let me know if you have seen any other brooms in your area that might be of interest.

Scott Antrim

Cancel Edit
Save
Posted October 1, 2018 at 3:10 pm

This looks very interesting. But the presence of multiple growths on the same plant strongly suggests that these growths are due to environmental factors, such as insects, disease … ? A genetic mutation, creating a witch’s broom growth form that could be “captured” by propagation, would not occur multiple times on the same plant.

Patrick Horan http://savinghemlocks.org/saving-hemlock-witchs-brooms/

Cancel Edit
Save
Posted October 1, 2018 at 3:13 pm

This looks very interesting. But the presence of multiple growths on the same plant strongly suggests that these growths are due to environmental factors, such as insects, disease … ? A genetic mutation, creating a witch’s broom growth form that could be “captured” by propagation, would not occur multiple times on the same plant.

Patrick Horan<font face=”HelveticaNeue_Light, Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif”></font>http://savinghemlocks.org/saving-hemlock-witchs-brooms/

Cancel Edit
Save
Posted November 18, 2018 at 1:05 pm

Thanks for the replys I will continue to watch these and update this coming summer.

Cancel Edit
Save

You must be to reply to this topic.

Tex_CircleOak_20110423_100